1) Who makes PhD admission decisions? What are the important criteria?

2) Are GRE scores required?

3) I have a GRE score of xxx points. Will I be admitted? What is the minimum GRE score for admission?

4) Is a masters degree required for admission to the PhD program?

5) My previous degrees were in a subject other than computer science. Can I still apply?

6) I already have a masters degree or graduate work in cs. How does this change things? Can I transfer credits into the program?

7) I read that poly has several campuses. Can I pursue the PhD on any of the campuses?

8) Can I use the online applications to apply for the PhD program? Why not?

9) I have been admitted to or I am currently enrolled in the MS program in cs at poly. Can I transfer into the PhD program?

10) I am an undergraduate at poly who plans to pursue a phd later, either at poly or elsewhere. what should i do?

11) Is previous research experience required to get admitted to the PhD?

12) I am a local applicant living in the new york area. Can I visit and discuss my application face-to-face?

13) Do you admit people for part-time study towards a PhD?

14) Do all full-time PhD students receive financial support?

15) If I indicate that I might have some funding to support my studies, will this decrease my chances of being offered support from poly?

16) I am currently applying for the program. Should I contact faculty members to ask for admission or financial support?

17) The deadline for applications for admission with support has already passed. Can I still apply late?

18) Do you admit new PhD students in the spring semester?

19) Whom should I ask for letters of recommendation? How many letters are needed?

20) When should I expect a decision about my application? How much time will I have to make my decision? Will my decision be binding or can I later decide to attend another school?

21) Whom should I contact with additional questions?


1) WHO MAKES PhD ADMISSION DECISIONS? WHAT ARE THE IMPORTANT CRITERIA?
PhD admission decisions are made directly by the faculty of the CIS department. Each admission is evaluated individually. The most important factors are previous academic background (GPA and courses taken), letters of reference, previous research experience, relevant professional experience, GRE scores, and statement of purpose. In addition, the candidate's area of interest and area of previous research or work experience may also play an important role, and applicants whose background matches current research activities in the department will have a better chance. On the other hand, if you plan to pursue research in an area that is not represented at all in our department, then your chances will be lower and we would recommend applying to another school instead. Go to top...

2) ARE GRE SCORES REQUIRED?
Scores for the GRE General Score are required from all applicants. We do not require scores for the CS subject test, but you may submit them as part of your application.
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3) I HAVE A GRE SCORE OF XXX POINTS. WILL I BE ADMITTED? WHAT IS THE MINIMUM GRE SCORE FOR ADMISSION?
We consider your entire application to make decisions on admission and support. A high GRE score alone does not guarantee admission. There are also no specified minimum scores for the GRE, but be aware that admission is highly competitive so high scores are expected unless there is some other significant strength in the application that can make up for it.
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4) IS A MASTERS DEGREE REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION TO THE PhD PROGRAM?
No, a Masters degree is not required, and people with undergraduate or graduate degrees can apply. Go to top...

5) MY PREVIOUS DEGREES WERE IN A SUBJECT OTHER THAN COMPUTER SCIENCE. CAN I STILL APPLY?
Yes, though we expect you to have significant background in CS or closely related fields. Admission is unlikely if we conclude that significant course work would be needed to make up for missing background in CS. For closely related fields such as Computer Engineering or EE this may often not be a big problem, but if your undergraduate background is in a very different field, then first getting an MS degree in CS may be a better idea.
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6) I ALREADY HAVE AN MASTERS DEGREE OR GRADUATE WORK IN CS. HOW DOES THIS CHANGE THINGS? CAN I TRANSFER CREDITS INTO THE PROGRAM?
You may be able to transfer some credits into our PhD program. This will usually be decided after you arrive at Poly. Also, if you already have a Masters degree in CS from another institution, then you will not be awarded another MS degree from Poly. Having already a Masters degree can be advantageous if it shows that a candidate has strong and broad background and/or if it includes some research. On the other hand, we may also expect more from somebody who already has a Masters degree.
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7) I READ THAT POLY HAS SEVERAL CAMPUSES. CAN I PURSUE THE PhD ON ANY OF THE CAMPUSES?
No, only in Brooklyn and in some cases in Westchester. The PhD program is based at the Brooklyn campus. Almost all faculty involved in the program are based in Brooklyn, and most of the research actitivities in the department take place there as well. There are a limited number of part-time students that do most of their course work and thesis work at the Westchester campus, though some parts of the program may require coming to Brooklyn. All full-time supported PhD students are expected to pursue their studies at the Brooklyn campus.
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8) CAN I USE THE ONLINE APPLICATIONS TO APPLY FOR THE PhD PROGRAM? WHY NOT?
We ask all applicants for the PhD program to apply by filling out a printed application form and mailing it to the stated address. The reason is that PhD applications require additional materials, and the online system may sometimes lose or corrupt some of those materials. You may download and print out the application form available
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9) I HAVE BEEN ADMITTED TO OR I AM CURRENTLY ENROLLED IN THE MS PROGRAM IN CS AT POLY. CAN I TRANSFER INTO THE PhD PROGRAM?
Admission to the PhD program is separate from the MS program, and is significantly more competitive. You need to apply for the PhD program like everybody else. Be aware that to be considered for the PhD program, you should be among the top students in the MS program. Talk to a faculty member or the graduate advisor before applying for a transfer into the PhD program.
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10) I AM AN UNDERGRADUATE AT POLY WHO PLANS TO PURSUE A PhD LATER, EITHER AT POLY OR ELSEWHERE. WHAT SHOULD I DO?
The earlier you start planning ahead the better. Ask a faculty member for advice. Consider working on some research with a faculty member. Research experience is usually more important for getting into a good program than a slightly better GRE. Do not start planning in your final year. Also consider schools other than Poly. While we always like to get good students, a change of institution can sometimes be healthy for your academic career.
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11) IS PREVIOUS RESEARCH EXPERIENCE REQUIRED TO GET ADMITTED TO THE PhD?
No, though it is highly desirable if you have some. Make sure to describe such experience in your statement and try to get a letter of reference discussing it. Research experience is particularly important for applicants who already have a Masters degree, while for students who are still undergrads it is less common to have a significant research record. In general, we are looking for applicants who have shown scholarship and initiative beyond the basic degree requirements. Also discuss relevant professional experience in your statement and resume.
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12) I AM A LOCAL APPLICANT LIVING IN THE NEW YORK AREA. CAN I VISIT AND DISCUSS MY APPLICATION FACE-TO-FACE?
Yes, in fact we recommend this. Make contact early to get advice on how to apply and if we are the right choice for you. In some cases we may also ask you to come for an interview during the admissions process. If you consider spending several years of you life on a PhD, and live in the area, there is no reason not to come by to have a look.
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13) DO YOU ADMIT PEOPLE FOR PART-TIME STUDY TOWARDS A PhD?
Yes, though we believe that it is not always a good idea to pursue a PhD part-time. We understand there are circumstances where full-time study is not possible and try to accommodate part-time students, but otherwise we strongly recommend going full-time, at least for some of the duration of study. In our experience, being part-time greatly increases the time it takes to finish the program and decreases the success rate. Consider carefully how this fits into your professional situation. There are some employers (such as colleges or research labs) that may be very supportive in terms of giving time off or tuition support. Note that part-time students typically do not receive financial support such as scholarships or assistantships from the department. Contact the advisor and discuss such plans with our faculty. Go to top...

14) DO ALL FULL-TIME PhD STUDENTS RECEIVE FINANCIAL SUPPORT?
Basically, yes, but let's be more precise. For applicants that indicate that they require financial support to attend, or that do not show sufficient financial resources in their application, we will typically only offer admission if we can offer sufficient financial support (though there may be exceptions). For applicants that have other support, we may sometimes admit people without offering support (see also next item).
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15) IF I INDICATE THAT I MIGHT HAVE SOME FUNDING TO SUPPORT MY STUDIES, WILL THIS DECREASE MY CHANCES OF BEING OFFERED SUPPORT FROM POLY?
The answer may depend on the type of funding you already have. If you have an outside scholarship (say, a US or foreign government or private scholarship) or a commitment by a company to support you over several years, then we would expect you to use this funding if admitted. If you show personal and family funds as your source of support, then we would assume that you would still prefer getting support from us, and that you would not be happy to entirely support yourself from those funds over the several years of your PhD study. In that case, chances are that you would be considered the same as applicants requiring support. In some case, when we do not have enough funding to support all strong applicants, we may offer admission without support in the first year, with the expectation that the department will make an effort to find support in the second year if the student maintains a strong record in the first year.
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16) I AM CURRENTLY APPLYING FOR THE PROGRAM. SHOULD I CONTACT FACULTY MEMBERS TO ASK FOR ADMISSION OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT?
Please do not email multiple faculty members to ask about admission and possibilities for support. You may contact an individual faculty member if your research interests and background are directly related to his/her work. But please do not broadcast requests to all faculty. To inquire on the status of your application, please contact the Director of Graduate Studies.
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17) THE DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION WITH SUPPORT HAS ALREADY PASSED. CAN I STILL APPLY LATE?
Yes, you can still apply a little later. We STRONGLY recommend applying by the deadline though. If you apply later, your chances of obtaining support will be diminished, and very late applications (say April or later) will likely not receive any consideration for support. For admission without support, you may apply until May 31, but earlier is better. Be aware that for international students, some time is needed for the visa process, so very late applications might run into problems even if no support is requested.
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18) DO YOU ADMIT NEW PhD STUDENTS IN THE SPRING SEMESTER?
Usually not, except in cases such as internal transfers into the program or when a faculty member recommends a particular student for admission and agrees to provide support. Other applications are usually only evaluated once a year in the spring for the next fall semester.
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19) WHOM SHOULD I ASK FOR LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION? HOW MANY LETTERS ARE NEEDED?
We require at least 2 letters, but strongly recommend asking for 3-4 letters. Some of the letters may be from job supervisors and employers, but we suggest that at least 2 should be from faculty at your undergraduate (and graduate if applicable) places of study. If you have been out of school for several years, nonetheless make an effort to contact those faculty members and ask for a letter. Do not apply with multiple letters from various employers. Letters should address previous research experience that you might have had during your studies.
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20) WHEN SHOULD I EXPECT A DECISION ABOUT MY APPLICATION? HOW MUCH TIME WILL I HAVE TO MAKE MY DECISION? WILL MY DECISION BE BINDING OR CAN I LATER DECIDE TO ATTEND ANOTHER SCHOOL?
For applications for financial support that meet the February 15 deadline, decisions are typically made during March and April. For other applications that arrive later, decisions should be made around two months after we receive the application. For admissions with financial support, we follow the
guidelines of the Council of Graduate Schools. This means that we try to make offers before April 15, and we will not require a binding decision before April 15. Any decision to accept our offer of admission with support will be considered binding. Occasionally we may decide to make offers of support after April 15, due to additional funding becoming available. In that case, you will get a limited amount of time (1-2 weeks) to make a binding decision. Go to top...

21) WHOM SHOULD I CONTACT WITH ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS?
Please contact the Director of Graduate Studies for all additional questions, by sending email to dgs@cis.poly.edu. The Director position may rotate between different faculty members, so please use the above email for contact.
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